Wednesday, 15 January 2014

The Scarecrow, a Wizard of Oz inspired poem by Adam Common, poet

I've been reading the great Eric Shanower adaptation of the Wizard of Oz lately and have a new found appreciation for how brilliant and deep all of the characters in both the original and the adapted versions of the book are. Here is a poem from the perspective of the Scarecrow, who can't understand why Dorothy would want to leave Oz, when Kansas is such a dull and dreary place.

She speaks of Kansas, bleak and greyish waste,
That lacks the plenty which my land can yield,
And states "to those with minds, no better place
Than home, despite the woes that home may field."
This mystery a ghost I fail to see,
Perhaps because my head is stuffed with straw,
How can all thoughtful men much rather be,
In arid lands, and not leave Kansas all?
So my conclusion then, I must surmise,
Is that this boring land, bereft and plain,
Is fortunate to what I call my eyes
That normal men all come with tender brains.

Get this wonderful graphic novel adaptation here. It's a beautiful book, much more faithful to the original text than the classic movie. It's also much, much funnier.




Follow me on Twitter http://twitter.com/#!/AdamWhitePoet

15 comments:

  1. nice one, Adam. I love that movie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too. The books are fantastic. Such a rich world, and full of intelligent and funny discourse, especially for children's books.

      Delete
  2. Nice poem...the stuffed head puts things in a much simpler perspective...

    Wander

    ReplyDelete
  3. smiles...really well done..and it is a choice too we must all make in where we end up and which land we choose to find the magic in...smiles.

    ReplyDelete
  4. nice..the magic of a land sometimes doesn't necessarily lie in its landscape - those that love see much deeper i guess..well done adam

    ReplyDelete
  5. Good job...very nicely woven, Adam :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. That is a great question...why would anyone want to leave OZ? Why not send the balloon to pick up the relatives in Kansas? Good one Adam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's funny that the thought eventually occurs to Dorothy that she should move the family to OZ, where they can live happy instead of miserable.

      Delete
  7. love that last line... nice! now i want to have a nap in a field of poppies...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And get dragged to safety by a hoard of mice who are happy to help since your friend the tin woodsman cut off a cat's head to stop him eating the queen of the mice?

      Delete
  8. I suppose the grass isn't always greener on the other side. Sometimes it's good enough wherever you happen to be.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I think getting into the head of a character in a published work, or that of your own personally drawn characters is a great exercise, perfectly utilized in poetry. Using such a widely known character such as the scarecrow can be a daunting task, seeing so many probably have recollections of this straw man, but you don't show any hesitancy and nail this pov piece very nicely. thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love doing this kinda of thing. It's an excellent exercise in characterisation trying to simmer down the bare bones of such a well known finger in to such a tightly packed environment as a short poem.

      The Scarecrow is one of my very favourite fictional characters because, despite his not having a brain, he is incredibly wise and intelligent, albeit in a naive, uninformed way. It's the same reason I love both the Tin Woodsman for his over emotional reaction to squashing a bug and the Cowardly Lion for mistaking fear for cowardice, despite the fact he is always brave when he is scared..

      Delete
  10. this is such a really deep insight into the subject of home. I love the rhythm and the rhymes you have used. A great post. Thankyou.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks very much Gerry. Glad you enjoyed it.

      Delete